Poetry Comparative Analysis Essay Assignment Write a 7-8 page (1750-2000 word) f

Poetry Comparative Analysis Essay Assignment
Write a 7-8 page (1750-2000 word) formal essay (typed in 12 pt
Times New Roman font and double-spaced)
comparing three poems by the same author. Your essay should
seek to connect and link the similarities in these poems while also
acknowledging their differences. These similarities and differences
should be at the core of your thesis. When writing your thesis
consider the following poetic elements: subject matter, form, tone,
imagery, line breaks, use of white space, punctuation, metaphor;
refrain, rhyme, irony, symbolism, conflict, historical context,
sound, other poetic devices, themes, and/or the ultimate message
of each poem. Specifically, make an original assertion about the
three poems with regard to select poetic elements from the above
mentioned list- preferably something beyond the level of”obvious
truth,
and therefore, insightful, thought-provoking and open to
debate.
Paragraph 1 (Introduction)
Topic Sentence – Begin with a topic sentence that
identifies the author and title of each poem and finds some point
of comparison between the three poems.
General Exposition – Next, provide exposition by
introducing each poem in a general way with some brief mention
of subject matter and historical background of the poem and/or
the biographical background of the author.
Narrow the Focus – Narrow the focus of your paper by
mentioning select poetic elements as the main components that you
will be analyzing in your paper. Remember, you should refer to the
list above for elements to focus on.
Thesis Statement – Make an original assertion about the
three poems with regard to the subject matter, form, tone,
imagery, line breaks, use of white space, punctuation, metaphor,
refrain, rhyme, irony, symbolism, conflict, historical context,
sound, other poetic devices, themes, and/or the ultimate message
of each poem- preferably something beyond the level of “obvious
truth,
and therefore, insightful, thought-provoking and open to
debate.BODY OF PAPER
Paragraphs 2-4 (Specific Exposition)
Specific Exposition/Analysis of Poems – Describe in
detail the elements of each poem with regard to some of the
following: subject matter, form, tone, imagery, line breaks, use of
white space, punctuation, metaphor, refrain, rhyme, irony,
symbolism, conflict, historical context, sound, other poetic
devices, themes, and/or the ultimate message of each poem
– with
some mention of poetic arc – i.e. how each poem unfolds, builds,
and reaches its conclusion. Make sure you don’t just summarize.
These paragraphs should describe the poems, but they should also
begin to offer your interpretations of each story.
Paragraphs 5-8 (Specific Points of Comparison)
Points of Comparison
– In support of your thesis
statement, use these paragraphs to analyze and investigate
specific points of comparison (or contrast) regarding: subject
matter, form, tone, imagery, line breaks, use of white space,
punctuation, metaphor, refrain, rhyme, irony, symbolism,
conflict, historical context, sound, other poetic devices, themes,
and/or the ultimate message of each poem. As part of
your analysis, please remember to provide relevant quotations as
evidence supporting your claims and observations.
Paragraph 9 (Conclusion)
Final Editorial Remarks
– Finish your essay with some
concluding remarks on the ultimate meaning/life-lesson(s)
associated with each poem, making specific reference to subject
matter, form, tone, imagery, line breaks, use of white space,
punctuation, metaphor, refrain, rhyme, irony, symbolism,
conflict, historical context, sound, other poetic devices, themes,
and/or the ultimate message of each poem and include final
editorial remarks (your
“verdict”) on how effectively each poem
deals with Other Considerations:
• Give your paper a creative, interesting title.
• Combine paraphrase, summary, and quotation with your own
interpretation, weaving quotations smoothly into your paper.
O
Avoid unnecessary summary. Your goal is to argue a thesis and
to support that argument with pertinent details from the work itself
(to include brief summaries of key details as well as direct
quotations).
• When including direct quotations, please remember that it is
your job to properly introduce the quotation (where does it occur
in the general poem, who is speaking?, etc.) and to also explain, IN
DETAIL, why you think the quotation is important in relation to
the point you are arguing at that moment in your essay. Be brave,
and spend some time analyzing the actual language of the
quotation.
• A paper that merely rehashes ideas we have discussed in class,
without adding anything new to the conversation, will not be
looked upon favorably. Here’s another way of stating this: I don’t
want to read papers in which students merely
mirror my interpretations. That bores me, and I’m not the kind of
teacher who needs to hear himself repeated in students’ writing. On
the other hand, good class discussions are often productive of
interesting insights into the texts we read–the key is: go further
than we went in class.